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20131202
20131210
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at the overall environment for shopping this holiday season, how is it going? are people being cautious, aggressive, what. >> we're still seeing a lot of concern actually among consumers. there's a feeling that the economy overall is going to turn around but individual households people are still feeling weary. >> because? >> because even -- >> job loss, job insecurity. >> even if things are maybe starting to look a little better for them, they're still concerned about it maybe lasting long enough for them to take advantage of it. and people have also started feeling that they can get by with less. a mindset shift too. also hearing some concern about things like the affordable care act coming into place. >> they don't know how much their insurance is going to cost them, how much they have to pay in deductibles next year. >> even at the highest end of economic spectrum we hear people have these high-end cadillac plans and their employers are starting to scale back the benefits. >> this translates into what people are spending overall. >> yes. >> how are you seeing it play out, mary? are
in the past historically be able to move together. are we in that same type of environment right now? >> i think you still have an anchored fixed income market. when you look at the treasury market, close to zero interest rates on the front end of the curve which means there's significant carry out there and available to people. until you see a next wave of growth, i think there's going to be natural buying in that low 3% area on tens, which will bring the market back in. i think we're range bound in fixed income world which means that the equity world can continue to rise. >> you know, it also brings up, though, the fact that we have a stock market today that's moving up with interest rates moving up. seems as though good news is now solidly good news for the market again. >> i agree with that. part of the reason is if you look over the last two years, most of the expansion has really been multiple expansion in the equity markets. the equity market is looking for revenue growth on the top line basis and if it sees its sights and can see growth, it's going to make another move higher. so t
.4%. the industrial player has been dealing with a slow growth environment but the company has been cutting costs and analysts say that could help future margin growth. next up, pea body energy down 30% year to date. but this quarter they're up 5.5%, coming off a strong beaten earnings thanks to lower expenses. finally shares of apple up little over 5% year to date. one of the big tech laggards this year. rising anticipation that apple will lock in a deal with china mobile has helped shares gain about 17% over the past quarter. new products, specifically in the wearable space is seen as another potential catalyst. many ap lists are bullish on apple. ubs upgrading the stock to buy, writing that higher of burberry's angela hence may provide an inspiring face to the company. >>> a major ruling has come out regarding detroit's future. a judge allowing the city's chapter 9 bankruptcy filing to proceed, despite big protests. senior correspondent scott cohen is live in detroit to sort it out for us. >> tyler, saying detroit's situation is unworkable and dangerous, judge roads approved the largest munici
doesn't get in the way in january. >> how do you invest now given the environment you laid out. >> carefully. >> all the time certainly. but we have the taper looming somewhere out there. >> yes. >> where do you still find attractive valuations around the world? >> i would break it down if you let me into two part of a description. long-term money is easy, don't overthink it, stay invested. probably the best advice we gave to clients had this year. short term money is getting harder, liquidity isn't there, volatility is low so we've been dialing back a little bit of the tactical call. the biggest discussion point for investors next year assuming you leave equities win and we do, does the rest of the world catch up with the u.s.? the u.s. has led so strongly. international markets haven't. if you look at the case numbers, pe, any forward valuation, europe we've talked about for a year. >> absolutely. >> interesting. japan as well. >> are you still as favorable on both of those countries as you were in the past? >> we are, although i keep saying, it's e with a small excitement no
create a more competitive environment for these high-yielding dividend stocks. >> i'm sure it will. thank you, seema. >>> well, today marks the anniversary of alan greenspan's famous irrational exuberance warning to the markets. >> how do we know when irrational exuberance has unduly escalated asset values which then become subject to unexpected and prolonged contractions? >> ah, so 17 years later, as stocks sit as record highs, which companies could be suffering from a little irrational exuberance of their own? dominic chu has been looking into that for us. >> think about it. let's pretend we're in a time machine, go back to december 5th, '96. markets then versus what they are today. on a bigger picture macro level, look at the crude trade, $26 a barrel. yield on ten-year treasuries, 6% back then. now under 3% today. and how about the stock market? we're just off those record l highs, 1,790 on that day in 1996, it was 745. valuations, they're reasonable on a relative basis. back then you were paying about $19 for every dollar in stock price in earnings for the s&p 500. today it's still l
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5